Centre for Continuing Education

Philosophy

Philosophy

Philosophy. Study the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality and existence.

Philosophy is the study of general and fundamental problems, such as those connected with reality, existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language. Philosophy is distinguished from other ways of addressing such problems by its critical, generally systematic approach and its reliance on rational argument. In more casual speech, by extension, “philosophy” can refer to “the most basic beliefs, concepts, and attitudes of an individual or group”. Learn about philosophy the smart way with philosophy courses at CCE, the University of Sydney.

Philosophy Course: Philosophy of Architecture

Philosophy. Study the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality and existence. This course explores the ways in which humans embody their ideas, spirit and power relations in built environments. Some issues discussed include: Architecture and the ethics of a ‘good’ society; The role of creativity: imaginary cities of the mind; architecture and the phenomenal body in space; and the fundamental components of architectural design. We will begin with the Roman philosopher Vitruvius.... [More]
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Philosophy Course: Formal Logic and Arguments

Philosophy. Study the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality and existence. This course offers a basic introduction to symbolic logic and deductive arguments, truth-tables and truth-trees. Formal logic is a powerful tool that can be used to evaluate an argument’s validity for proper form. Deductive arguments are found in philosophy, ethics and other disciplines where precision and rigour are required. Join us to learn how to translate arguments from English into propositional... [More]
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Philosophy Course: Simone de Beauvoir

Philosophy. Study the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality and existence. Since the publication of the 2010 new, unabridged English translation of The Second Sex, there has been a growing interest in the extent and complexity of de Beauvoir’s philosophical ideas. Some of these ideas are: The nature and limits of human freedom (She Came to Stay, Pyrrhus and Cineas); The role of imagination in the authentic construction of self (The Ethics of Ambiguity); The phenomenology of sex... [More]
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Philosophy Course: Philosophy of the Body and Mind

Philosophy. Study the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality and existence. This course will examine philosophical ideas about the nature of the human body: what kind of entity is it, and how does it produce our self-hood as individuals and as a species? We will draw from both the Western and Chinese philosophical traditions. Some topics include the concept of a healthy body; the body and sexuality; the body and pain; the concept of ‘deviant bodies’ (on this issue, we will use... [More]
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Philosophy Course: Machiavelli and Political Philosophy

Philosophy. Study the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality and existence. Machiavelli’s influence on modern political theory cannot be overstated. The Prince, his most famous work, provides an interesting lens for examining modern politics and is perhaps more relevant than ever. The term ‘Machiavellian intelligence’ refers to the principles of his political philosophy and the idea that success in politics can be secured by manging behaviours and manipulating social groups. In... [More]
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Philosophy Course: Philosophy of Religion

Philosophy. Study the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality and existence. This course on the philosophy of religion examines religious experience while borrowing from different schools of thought, including psychology, anthropology, sociology, phenomenology and political theory. Religion is central to the personal lives of many people. It is integrated in the cultural heritage of every people, and understanding it is crucial to understanding the human condition. We will delve... [More]
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Philosophy Course: Philosophy of Religion

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Philosophy and Film Course: The Philosophy in 'Inception'

Philosophy. Study the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality and existence. Join us as we explore the philosophy behind Christopher Nolan’s film Inception. This philosophy course considers the theoretical presuppositions inherent in the film and the key themes of dreams as alternate states to reality, knowledge (how do you know?), and scepticism (do we know anything?). Finally, we will consider the film’s final ‘cliff-hanger’ scene in which many of us want to know, did the top... [More]
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Philosophy course: Free Will, Fate, and Determinism

Philosophy. Study the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality and existence. This philosophy course considers the various puzzles concerning the definition, nature and existence of free will, and the two alleged threats to free will: determinism and fate. Join us for a discussion on determinism as the main threat to freedom. Arguments for and against whether free will exists will be considered. This course will refer to the films, Minority Report and The Adjustment Bureau... [More]
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Philosophy Course: Philosophy of Enlightenment

Philosophy. Study the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality and existence. To be ‘enlightened’ is to be set free from false beliefs: in that sense of the word it is as relevant to our world as it was to the eighteenth century. But this is a complex story; the ideas of progress, reason and economic capitalism, unleashed in the eighteenth century have also fed into the destructive feature of modern history. This course aims to understand the philosophy of the enlightenment from... [More]
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Philosophy Course: Heidegger

Philosophy. Study the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality and existence. For Heidegger “we ourselves are the entities to be analyzed” and this is both a rational, objective task and a subjective introspection on ourselves. His phenomenology of ‘lived experience’ is a corrective to the enlightenment idea of reason: “Thinking begins only when we have come to know that reason, glorified for centuries, is the stiff-necked adversary of thought”. This course will approach... [More]
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